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Captain Cook was the first QUEUE JUMPER – This Country needs a Fucking Shake Up (Wake UP)

Yeas, I know I feel the need to post this song periodically, but, after the last month or so, with BORDER FORCE and the like, I totally think it’s time again

Well I’m left sitting here staring into a beer
shaking my head at the same ol’ loathing and fear
Stranger in my own land, can’t understand
How the very word Australian has just been damned
I fucking hate myself, take ‘Aussie’ from my name
Erase this endless shame, forever casting blame
If you don’t act the same will I destroy you?
Everyone looks the same beaten, black and blue
So I’ve had enough of these redneck pricks
When fact is the only real shit that sticks
Watch as I tear the very skin from my face
So none’ll see my race, my deep disgrace
Your not even from here in the first place
And those that are you wanna further debate
Nup, no more, never again whether by fist or pen
I will defend, cos I’m at a loose end
The shattered remnants of Aussie dignity
I’m a skip, whitey, round-eye suprise me
By using your shrivelled brain to please explain
How the clever country just went down the drain
We rode the sheep’s back now the sheep ride you
If this is how its gonna be don’t call me ‘true blue’
I denounce my ancestors, wounds still fester
If you say ‘it aint so’ I suggest ya’ wake up

(Chorus)

It’s time for you to
Wake up – this country needs a fucking shake up
Wake up – these cunts need a shake up (x4)

Talkback squawking hacks won’t relax
Until Jones’y, Zemanek and Laws are all axed
77 percent of aussies are racist
And if you’re here, I’ll say it your faces
Rich redneck pricks still hold all the aces
So I’ll buy ya a beer, with an arsenic chaser
Better off dead? is that what I’ve said?
Tempting to take for all the blood you’ve shed
No doubt your as bad as your dads and ya mums
Mainsteam media making me so fucking glum
Just anglo reality, intellectual cavities
Channel 9 fostering prejudiced mentalities
I won’t be a casualty, just mention casually
That I can’t stand for you shit-eating bullies
Preying on peeps without a mainstream voice
Most of you stay silent but I’ve got no choice

(Chorus)

Well I’ve yelled my lungs out but to no avail
Well I’ve yelled my lungs out but to no avail
Well I’ve yelled my lungs out but to no fukin’ avail
That you’re a stranger yourself now thats the sting in the tail
Captain Cook was the very first queue jumper
It was immigrant labour that made Australia plumper
Enough is enough, whiteys go pack your stuff
Don’t wanna live in England? That’s fucking tough
I’m sick and tired of this redneck wonderland
Most’ve you stay silent and I can’t understand
I just can’t understand (understand)

It’s time for you to
Wake up – this country needs a fucking shake up
Wake up – these cunts need a shake up (x4)

and, yeah, deliberately publishing at 7am. Because that’s the best time to call your incompetent pollies cunts.

On the so-called “conscience vote”

So, there’s this thing in Australian politics where, despite signing up for a certain party and normally being help to vote to what the party thinks, means thaat individual members of parliament are allowed to make a “Consceince Vote” when it comes to matters where, basically, religion may come into play.

A conscience vote or free vote is a type of vote in a legislative body where legislators are allowed to vote according to their own personal conscience rather than according to an official line set down by their political party.

Thanks, Wikipedia

So, you have parties like the Labor party where you can get FIRED for voting against the caucus, where MPs can vote for or against say, euthanasia, or abortion laws, and not fear the wrath of their party.

Or, they can feel that the same “moral” status applies to issues that are clearly about discriminating against 10% of the population, and say that
gay marriage” is a matter of conscience, whereas it’s really a matter of changing one or two words so that people can enter into state-sanctioned monogamous unions. You know, because for tax purposes same-sex partnerships are taxed the same and given the same cred as M/F relationships.

(Personally, I wanna see everyone move past the marriage thing and get back to the late 80s wehere “FUCK YOU I’m not gonna be anyone’s “wife” and change my name and submit to it all”)

But,

Think about history.

Once upon a time it was immoral for a woman to go to work when her husband should be the breadwinner. Undermining him and all that.

So why not got back to the 70s and call a “conscience vote” on maternity leave, or day care subsidies, because, unless her husband is dead or maimed, a woman’s place is at home with her kids, right?

That’s the “traditional” way. Just like marriages is between one man and one woman.

For life.

To the exclusion of all others.

So, basically, I don’t see gay marriage as a conscience issue. I see it as something that we just need to get over, like thinking that Aborigines are people and that women are capable of voting.

And if yu’re ELECTORATE wants it, isn’t it your JOB to say YES?

Am I wrong?

So, there’s no more Lambie and The Brick in PUP

We had thought that THIS was the end of Lambie and the Brick…

But, there’s only one member of the Palmer United Party left in the senate, after Lazarus and Lambie left….

\

A sad sad day

Classic Lambie and the Brick (and Wang)

What WILL 2015 bring?

Un- and Under- Employment, Mental Illness, and me

Mulling over a few things today, prompted a little by the welfare reform report and various opinion and news pieces generated by it, along with discussion by friends about the good and the bad of the proposals and their potential to help and hinder those needing support.

I also, just now, realised that it’s been over 3 years now since I’ve had full time work. On the back of huge issues from anxiety (and a not yet diagnosed personality disorder) I resigned from my last full time work – a twelve month contract – in February 2012.

I spent six months kinda looking for work, not sure if I was ready, and then picked up two part time gigs – a 17 hour a week contract and some casual private practice work – around September.

I juggled these, having my first hospital stays, for 12 and 18 months respectively, resigning from one due to my crazy levels of stress around it all, and then was “let go” at the end of 2013 from the other, due to erratic performance, all strongly influenced by my difficulties managing my anxiety and stress and general erratic behaviour.

I’ve been lucky enough that my ex insisted on my saving money, and having that to fall back on the first gap period, and also receiving or separation settlement at the start of my current blank period. Which also aligned with my sister’s suicide attempt, so I had bigger issues to focus on rather than my own for the start of 2014. Helping her and her kids stay healthy took to fore, and I could justify my blase attitude to reentering the workforce. It was “ok” because I was helping someone else and not just myself.

I started looking at work again mid year. Applied for some things, confident that I could talk my way into them, like I had in the last positions…. but my past failures were starting to weigh me down. Initially, it was always framed as them having someone else, who had more experience, or lived in the area already, and that was okay.

Then I started to see jobs I applied for being re-advertised, and being told that I’m just not operating at a senior enough level for their position. When they re-advertise by don’t call or email you first? That’s the worst.

So, I got on “the dole” in July. Meeting my requirements, applying for any speech or related job I could find, local or not.

Then bringing it back, realising that I probably SHOULDN’T move away from Newcastle anyway, or at least not too far. This is my home. My safe home base.

So I broadened what I was looking for, but haven’t got a foot in. I get the occasional speechie interview still, on the back of my apparent experience and well written applications. But that’s as far as it goes.

I’m still seeing a psychologist weekly, though that will end soon. I have a need to help family and others – I can’t help myself. And I doubt that I’m anywhere near capable of working full time even if I do get a gig doing something mind-numbing let alone something with responsibility like speech or as a carer. So I always wonder on why, if all I’m gonna get to is part time work, then why are my requirements for Centrelink all assuming that I’m able to job search or complete tasks and courses full time?

I’m told I will be reviewed and possibly offered more support along these lines, like access to courses for free or something. But the poor girl who has my case is stressed and overworked herself (and shares my diagnosis!) and there is so much just ticking off done. I don’t get any money in for the company being university educated I should be able to fend for myself. It’ll happen, but I’m just happy to get out of there rather than have to dredge up crappy things when I’m in a good space in order to beg for more help.

I don’t know where I’m going with this. I just wanted to ramble and say that it’s hard. Yes, people tell me to get a retail or hospitality job to fill in time, but they’re just as hard to break into as any industry, and I always get the thanks but no thanks, along with the assumption I’m gonna pick up and leave on them.

Oh, and I tried to get a role volunteering with at risk kids, but one of their eligibility requirements was not having been hospitalised for a mental illness in the last 3 years. They said I could get a clearance letter from a psychiatrist, but that’s all too hard right now.

So..
here’s my cool possums. They are awesome. The live up in my roof and we give them apples each night. If we forget, they rattle the gate for attention.

Possums with apple

No, Tony Abbott, you can’t dismiss social media as ‘electronic graffiti’ (via The Conversation)

No, Tony Abbott, you can't dismiss social media as 'electronic graffiti'

By Collette Snowden, University of South Australia

Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s announcement of a knighthood for Prince Philip on Australia Day sparked both a mainstream and social media storm. But Abbott’s response to this backlash, when he casually dismissed the public expression of incredulity at the knighthood, only served to create another social media story. Abbott said:

Social media is kind of like electronic graffiti and I think that in the media, you make a big mistake to pay too much attention to social media.

You wouldn’t report what’s sprayed up on the walls of buildings and look, as I said, social media has its place, but it’s anonymous. It’s often very abusive and, in a sense, it has about as much authority and credibility as graffiti that happens to be put forward by means of IT.

This was not the first time Abbott has described social media as such. And while he is is partly right, he is mostly wrong. Social media is indeed electronic graffiti, but the big mistake is not in paying too much attention to it, but in paying too little.

As a former journalist, Abbott should know that everyone who writes in public writes to be heard. The evidence is found not only in contemporary case studies, but in the role of graffiti in social and political life through the ages.

Like all forms of human expression, graffiti – including its electronic form – has a wide range of quality. Abbott’s narrow view of graffiti seems to confuse the banality of “X woz here” with graffiti as a tool of subversion and a medium for the expression of political criticism and social outrage.

While most now associate the term “graffiti” with tags or drawing “sprayed up on the walls”, it was originally used to refer to the casual writing and drawing found on the walls of Pompeii, Rome and Egypt. Graffiti is found throughout the world on buildings, in public and private locations, on natural landmarks or sacred temples, and in and on the objects of daily life.

Everywhere humans go they leave graffiti. Ancient tourists scrawled on the walls of the pyramids. Long before that they drew cave paintings such as those on Australia’s Burrup Peninsula to record life and events in ancient human societies.

The development of writing allowed people to produce inventive graffiti to make jokes, defame their enemies, boast about their sexual prowess, profess their love and express dissent. Graffiti may have been anonymous but it could be powerful. It has certainly been a medium that subverted and challenged the status quo and presented new ideas. What graffiti artists write about, in any age, can be significant as an expression of public focus, attention or concern.

Political graffiti is frequently a sign of inequality in a society. This is a form of media that allows the disempowered or unrepresented to have a public voice. Some of the most potent public political statements today begin as graffiti. One of the most successful contemporary artists, Banksy, is a graffitist. Social media transfers graffiti from the street and amplifies its power and impact by rapidly increasing the audience.

British graffitist Banksy frequently references politics in his public artworks.
EPA/Will Oliver

Graffiti employs the writing genre of the epigram, as popularised by the Roman poet Martial, Marcus Valerius Martialis, who was known for his obscene and insulting language and astute self-promotion. He understood, with the canny sense of an entrepreneur, that short-form writing was more appealing to a general audience. He targeted politicians, celebrities and anyone he didn’t like.

Martial would love Twitter. Here’s some examples of his work.

A drop of venom, a little bit of gall. Lacking these, my friend, your epigrams lack all.

The rich know anger helps the cost of living. Hating’s more economical than giving.

Your little dog licks your mouth and lips, Manneia. I am not surprised — it always enjoyed eating shit.

Martial was a celebrity in Ancient Rome, but his work became a kind of gold standard for Western literature when rediscovered in the Renaissance. He influenced a wide range of writers, including Ben Johnson, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Lord Byron, as well as many European writers.

It’s not surprising that the language of social media uses the brutal brevity of the epigram. The short, concise and clever language produces the best, most powerful graffiti and, not coincidentally, the most entertaining text messages, tweets and social media posts.

To dismiss an outpouring of scorn and criticism on social media as lacking credibility is to ignore public opinion that is unfiltered and at its most honest – even if it’s disagreeable, and possibly wrong. Where and how people express their views is not as important as what they say.

Every prime minister should pay as close attention to what is being said by the electronic graffiti artists on social media as they do to focus groups and opinion polls.

The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

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